Planning a model prison: Holloway, 1854

Victorian prisons may not be such a great topic for Christmas (except for Dickens, perhaps, in one of his bleaker moods) but as usual I’m guided by the things that I’ve found. Today we have one of the original ground plans for HM Prison Holloway.   It is signed by…

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Charles Henry Sanford’s cartographic book plate

1892 The Land of the Almighty Dollar, a critical account of the United Sates chiefly based on the author’s travels in New York and Chicago.   I’ve been dipping into it and the text is worthy of a post in itself, but I’m determined to stick to the point. I bought this…

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Festivals, Signings & Cake

So, the eagerly awaited (by its authors, certainly) A History of the 20th Century in 100 Maps by Bryars & Harper has now hit the shops, published by the British Library here in the UK and by the University of Chicago Press in the US. Here’s what 100 copies looks…

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Leslie George Bullock: cartoon maps for children

Leslie George Bullock (1904-1971) first cropped up on these pages a couple of years ago, in a post about pictorial maps of London. He created whimsical but informative cartoon maps for children, most notably perhaps his Children’s Map of London, originally sold in aid of Great Ormond Street:   He…

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The speeches and writings of MK Gandhi – the earliest anthologies

It is almost a century since M.K. Gandhi returned permanently to India, in 1915. He was a London-trained lawyer in his mid forties, already possessing an international reputation after twenty years in South Africa, where he developed his theories of non violent civil disobedience. He was feted by Indian nationalists…

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Underground Gallery

The London Underground is the world’s oldest underground railway. In the decade or so that I’ve been specialising in Tube maps I’ve seen spiralling interest in collecting the cartographic record of 150 years of underground travel. Hundreds of maps have been issued by London Transport, its immediate predecessor the London…

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Altlases of Empire

I seem to have a good selection of atlases of the British Empire at the moment:   Thematic atlases became especially popular in the later nineteenth-century, pioneered by firms such as W. & A.K. Johnston and Bartholomew. Here’s an example of an 1877 empire atlas by the latter:   Internally…

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Cornering the states of MacDonald Gill’s Wonderground map

Today’s guest on the blog is my good friend Winfrid de Munck. Twentieth Century maps, until recently the preserve of a few enthusiasts, are now the focus of serious and sustained study – but a great deal remains to be learned. This is a perfect example of why so many of…

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