Blog

How To Make Maps: Benjamin Wilme’s Hand-Book For Mapping, Engineering, & Architectural Drawing
By Tim / 15/08/2020

The proper art of map-making, explained and illustrated

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How To Read Maps: Dedication, That’s What You Need
By Tim / 15/08/2020

From our How To Read Maps series: we examine puffery and policy in map dedication

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Mary, Mary: Where Did Your Bookshop Go?
By Tim / 15/08/2020

On the trail of Mary Camige and Mary Sims, poster artists and co-owners of the Portman Bookstore

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Beyond Claret Country: Louis Larmat and the First National Wine Atlas
By Tim / 02/07/2020

New maps for new appellations: the story of the first national wine atlas

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Still Minding The Gap
By Tim / 09/06/2020

Recent posts about the lives of some of the less well known makers of London Underground maps generated a flurry of very pleasant correspondence. Thank you! This piece is all about encouraging even more of it, especially if you have any information about anyone who made maps for London Transport and its predecessors – we’d really like to hear from you.

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John Speed’s Big Top Mystery
By Tim / 09/06/2020

A tentative investigation into a pavilion symbol that keeps turning up on maps with no explanation…

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Noble Seats & How To Spot Them
By Tim / 09/06/2020

From our How To Read Maps series: the depiction of great estates as a distinctive and prominent feature of English county cartography

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A Quantum of Knowledge
By Tim / 09/06/2020

An exegesis of the use of antiquarian maps in James Bond films

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The Man Who Sacked Harry Beck: Rethinking Harold Hutchison
By Tim / 11/05/2020

A deeper dive into the life and works of Harold F Hutchison, a London underground map designer mostly famous for sacking Harry Beck. We’ve done our share of Hutch-shaming over the years, so consider this a mea culpa…

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Mind The Gap! Underground mapmakers revealed…
By Tim / 04/05/2020

Let’s look at three names which appear on maps of the London underground: WE Soar, JC Betts, and EG Perman. These names are familiar but normally catalogued (by me and everyone else, including the Transport Museum) with surname and initials as given, without further elucidation. Who were they?

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