Arrian on the Roman Army

£750.00

Arrian rose to the highest military and civil offices in the Roman Empire, becoming consul in 130 AD. He is most famous for his history of Alexander the Great, but also composed a number of valuable other works collected here.

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Quick Description

Title

Arrian on the Roman Army

Author(s)

Arrian

Editor(s)

BLANCKAERT, Nicolaas

Publisher

WAESBERGHE, Johannes & Gillis Janssonius van

Place of publication

Amsterdam

Date of publication

1683

Binding

contemporary vellum

Full Description

Arrian: [Greek title: Arrianou techne taktike, ektaxis kat Alanon… ] Ars Tactica, Acies Contra Alanos, Periplus Maris Erythraei, Liber De Venatione, Epictiti Enchiridion, Eiusdem Apopthegmata et Fragmenta, quae in Ioannis Stobaei florilegio, et in A. Gelli Noctibus Atticus supersunt. Cum interpretibus Latinis & Notis […] Nicolai Blancardi. Amstelodami [Amsterdam]: apud Janssonio Waesbergios, 1683
8vo. pp. [xiv], 450, [iv] errata. With additional engraved title, two folding maps and folding table of military formations. (Further stub facing p.129, but no indication that anything has been removed.) Parallel text in Greek and Latin edited by Nicolaas Blanckaert or Blankaart. Several engravings of military formations in the text of the Ars Tactica. A clean copy. Contemporary vellum with yapp edges, slightly soiled and stained.

Arrian rose to the highest military and civil offices in the Roman Empire, becoming consul in 130 AD. He is most famous for his history of Alexander the Great, but also composed a number of valuable other works collected here. His Tactica reflects his time in the army, and the second work in this collection is a report of a military operation undertaken by Arrian himself to contain tribes of Iranian horsemen (the Alans) in the Steppes of Southern Russia. It contains detailed information about the Black Sea Coasts. The next work on hunting contains information on breeding and training dogs. Arrian had also been a pupil of Epictetus and we owe our knowledge of Epictetus’ teaching to him. Arrian wrote eight books which recorded the didactic conversations and lectures of his teacher. The influential ‘Enchiridion’ included here is composed of excerpts from Arrian arranged by subject matter.